Fall 2015 Courses in TILE

Fall 2015 Courses in TILE

Biology

Foundations of Biology, BIOL:1411:0A02

Brenda Leicht

Foundations of Biology will emphasize the unifying concepts of living systems.  The course is organized into three conceptual units of approximately equal length and weight.  The first unit will emphasize the common molecular and cellular basis of life.  The second unit will emphasize the universal nature of genetic information and the mechanisms of transmission, change and expression of that information in living systems.  The final unit will focus on the evolution of current living organisms from a common ancestor, the way evolutionary relationships are determined, and the evolutionary forces that shaped the past and present organisms on earth. Mini-lectures will introduce new material and expand on concepts from the assigned reading.  Students will be expected to do the assigned reading ahead of time so that much of class time can be spent on activities such as simulations, discussions, group work, and presentations.  The course will have an accompanying laboratory in which students carry out multi-week projects in each of the three conceptual areas.  Wet labs and dry labs will alternate.  Course grades will be based on online quizzes, in-class assessments (IF-AT or clicker questions), two midterm exams, a final exam, laboratory quizzes, laboratory reports and/or group presentations.

 

Evolution Lab, BIOL:3676:0AAA

Ana Llopart

The goal of this course is to apply experimental methods commonly used to examine patterns of diversity within and between species at organismal, behavioral and molecular levels. Methods used in this course are relevant to a variety of applications in evolutionary biology including sampling of biodiversity, identifying species, assessing DNA variation in populations, and measuring changes in gene expression between species and in their hybrids. Activities of the course will demonstrate and/or rely upon fundamental evolutionary principles. Students will be evaluated based on written reports, an oral presentation, quizzes, participation, and the laboratory notebook.

 

Cell Biology Laboratory, BIOL:3626:0AAA

Michael Dailey, Christopher Stipp

Conceptual understanding and technical skills in fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging, mammalian cell culture, electrophoresis, and expression of recombinant proteins. This course satisfies the investigative lab requirement of the B.S. degree or a lab requirement for the B.A. degree. Goals include basic research training to give students an idea of what scientific research entails, knowledge training to provide students with certain important principles operating inside the cell, and biotechnology training to expose students to modern techniques in cell and molecular biology. Course format consists of a one-hour lecture and a three-hour scheduled lab exercise each week.

 

First Year Seminar, BIOL:1000:0001

Bryant McAllister, Michael Dailey, Jan Fassler

With a single mouse-click sophisticated genetic tests on human ancestry are available directly to consumers at a cost less than most textbooks. Advances in human genetic analysis over the past 30 years have enabled the emergence and growth of this “recreational genetics” marketplace. This course will evaluate the science underlying genetic measures of human ancestry, compare the tests available from the varied companies that dominate the marketplace (e.g., Ancestry DNA, Family Tree DNA, The Genographic Project, and 23andMe), and interpret results obtained from the analysis of your own DNA sample.

The class will meet for 50 minutes one time per week over the semester. Ideally, students should be willing to provide a DNA sample that will be sent for analysis by 23andMe; however, submitting a sample is not required. Although the cost of the test will be covered by the course, results will be available only to the student. The first class meeting will be devoted to privacy issues and potential impacts of test results prior to consenting to participation. In preparation for interpreting results of the ancestry analysis, select scientific articles and book chapters will be read and discussed by the class. Portions of movies on human origins will also be viewed in class and discussed. Methods for navigating, using and interpreting results of the ancestry analysis will also be demonstrated.

Grading will be based on participation in class, two writing assignments where you will be expected to summarize a current news article on human genetic diversity, and a final writing assignment where you will be expected to describe who you are and how the analysis of your DNA has changed, enriched or had no influence on your perspective of yourself.

 

Bioinformatics, BIOL:4213

Jan Fassler

This is a one semester overview of topics in Bioinformatics including access to nucleotide and peptide sequence data, sequence alignment algorithms, molecular phylogeny, analysis of transcriptome data, proteomics, protein structure analysis, and regulatory bioinformatics.  Emphasis is on experimental methods and analytical approaches.   The course consists of two weekly computer lab sessions.  The course is open to undergraduate as well as graduate students. 

 The course is best suited to upper level undergraduates with strong performance and interest in Genetics or Biochemistry and graduate students with an interest in analysis of genomes, genome data and/or functional genomics.  The semester will be devoted to hands on computer-based workshops, theory based lectures and integrative group projects.  Grades will be based on exams, weekly reading quiz,  in-class exercises and the group project.

 

Advanced Teaching Internship in Biology, BIOL:4897

Brenda Leicht

Students enrolled in the course are assigned as interns in one or two laboratory sections of the Foundations of Biology course.  Interns attend a weekly training session on Monday evenings and complete a variety of online homework assignment.  The training sessions and assignments relate to technical, safety and pedagogical aspects of the laboratory exercise.  Students who register for 2 credits assist one graduate student TA in the teaching of one 2 hr. 50 min. lab section per week.  Students who register for 4 credits assist with the teaching of two  lab sections each week, typically with two different graduate students TAs.

 

Foundations of Biology, BIOL:1411

Brenda Leicht

Foundations of Biology will emphasize the unifying concepts of living systems.  The course is organized into three conceptual units of approximately equal length and weight.  The first unit will emphasize the common molecular and cellular basis of life.  The second unit will emphasize the universal nature of genetic information and the mechanisms of transmission, change and expression of that information in living systems.  The final unit will focus on the evolution of current living organisms from a common ancestor, the way evolutionary relationships are determined, and the evolutionary forces that shaped the past and present organisms on earth. Mini-lectures will introduce new material and expand on concepts from the assigned reading.  Students will be expected to do the assigned reading ahead of time so that much of class time can be spent on activities such as simulations, discussions, group work, and presentations.  The course will have an accompanying laboratory in which students carry out multi-week projects in each of the three conceptual areas.  Wet labs and dry labs will alternate.  Course grades will be based on online quizzes, in-class assessments (IF-AT or clicker questions), two midterm exams, a final exam, laboratory quizzes, laboratory reports and/or group presentations.

 

Creative NonFiction Writing

Writing for Business and Industry, CNW:3640

Mark Isham

This course prepares students for “real world” writing situations and is based on seminars that I do for companies throughout the Midwest. I also emphasize building a portfolio, resumes, cover letters, and interview skills for job searches. The course teaches techniques for revision--both within sentences for efficiency and clarity and within whole documents for comprehension, persuasion, and coherence. Students revise many kinds of transactional documents, from letters and memos to procedures and reports. All examples are drawn from actual business transactions. Students should emerge from the course with enhanced writing, editing, job search, and managerial skills.

Assignments, papers, exams, projects, special comments etc.

I require one paper every week. I give no exams. Students revise letters, memos, e-mails, reports, and other transactional documents. They also design and/or revise other documents of their own choosing. They work on sentence structure and they create cover letters and resumes, engage in mock interviews, and solve managerial problems. Students draw cartoons as part of their assessment of their job search experiences.

 

Rehabilitation and Counselor Education

School Culture and Classroom Management for School Counselors, RCE: 5204

Susannah Wood

American public elementary and secondary schools and the school counselor's role; classroom management for school counselors.

 

Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry, RCE:7338

Susannah Wood

Principles, processes of qualitative research in education; methods of design, data collection and analysis, interpretation, trustworthiness.

 

Seminar Current Issues and Trends in CES, RCE:7458

Armeda Wojciak

Recent trends, including debates and findings in literature related to best practices for the profession.

 

English

First Year Seminar, ENGL:1000

Mark Isham, Lauren Haldeman

“Memory is a kind of accomplishment”, says the poet William Carlos Williams and this course will help you take control of your learning process and remember what you learn. Record, compose, and apply your first college experiences as a series of stories and images. Use cartoons to improve your writing. You will explore new ways to map your experiences and work with others. You can cartoon without previous drawing experience or drawing skill. Study the work of those who use journals that reflect on their life experiences. Talk with some of these artists and writers who will come to class. Write and draw in class workshops. Go home and compose in your journal. I will grade your class participation, daily and weekly journal exercises, and your course project.

Assignments, papers, exams, projects, special comments etc.

Students draw cartoons and make journal entries. They will also create a course project: a sequence of cartoons and writing. I will grade class participation, daily and weekly journal exercises, and the course project. I give no exams.

 

Classical and Biblical Literature, ENGL:2206

Jeffrey Porter

American pop culture loves a good hero—from Xena the “warrior princess” and tomb-raider Lara Croft to Sam Worthington’s Perseus in the Clash of the Titans—many who battle assorted foes on celluloid while hardly breaking a sweat. These action figures are campy in the best sense of the term, and they refuse to be taken seriously. How different the hero of antiquity is, whose feats of greatness are often held up as definitive. Our goal in this class is to explore the ancient hero’s emblematic role across different cultures by working closely with selected classical and middle-eastern quest narratives. We’ll decode the symbolic logic of the hero and trace the subtle ways the myth evolves. What does the myth of the hero tell us about ancient narrative as a cultural system? How were violence and cruelty constructed and to what ends? What position do women occupy in an obviously male-dominated genre? How do questions of identity, sexuality, and power play out over time?

Books will be available at Prairie Lights

 

Honors Program

Honors First Year Seminar, HONR:1300

Matthew Gilchrist, Thomas Keegan

This course will support students’ efforts to plan, initiate, and undertake their own community-based projects or to contribute productively to existing initiatives. Students will explore ways they can become active, on campus and off, through joining or starting organizations and through imagining or contributing to projects that benefit the community. While being active in the community will surely bolster students’ applications for scholarships, internships, graduate schools, and jobs, the benefits to students are much more significant than padded résumés. Studies have shown that students who are engaged in their communities achieve more academically and find their studies more stimulating. A part of the course focus will be an effort to understand how learning is enhanced by activities outside the classroom, how students apply lessons from the classroom in practical projects, how students contribute to their school and community, and how such engagement helps students better understand their place in the world. Course projects will help students find suitable, practical outlets for their creative and academic interests and abilities. In the class, students will learn about successful student-led initiatives that have been started and led by University of Iowa students, such as the 10,000 Hours Show (http://www.the10kshow.com/) and Dance Marathon (http://dancemarathon.uiowa.edu/). Based upon assigned reading, discussion, and reflection, students will compose a personal engagement plan in which they set goals for themselves and identify the resources and skills they will need to accomplish those goals.

Grades will be earned as follows:

Being prepared for each class: 15%
Participation: 15%
Presentation on an organization student plans to join or start: 20%
Attending two events and giving reports: 30%
Brief final paper outlining goals for engagement: 20%

 

Honors Seminar in Values Society and Diversity, HONR:1670

Patrick Dolan

Small-class learning with a faculty member to explore fundamental questions on human experience from cultural, social, performative, philosophical, or spiritual perspectives.

 

Leadership Studies

Career Leadership Academy Part 1, LS:2002

Michael Venzon, Thomas Koeppel

Career Leadership Academy Part 1: Leadership in Practice (LS:2002) – is the first course in the Career Leadership Academy series. The semester-length course covers leadership history and concepts, goal setting, personal values and ethics, leadership skills, and career development information.  Students will learn about group dynamics and team-building, giving and receiving feedback, understanding difference, constructing a resume, preparing and delivering presentations, communication and listening, problem solving, and dealing with difficult people. The purpose of this course is to increase students’ understanding of themselves and others. Students will build skills and reflect on individual interests, abilities, and values in relation to leadership and career development. Students will apply what they learn in class to the real world through experiential learning activities including a Strengths-based team’s workshop, employer interactions, and a group presentation project.  Additional information on the Career Leadership Academy may be found at http://www.careers.uiowa.edu/leadershipacademy/

 

Career Leadership Academy Part 2, LS:3002

Stacy Narcotta-Welp

Career Leadership Academy Part 2: Leadership in Action (LS:3002) – is the final course in the Career Leadership Academy series.  The semester-length course covers transferable skills, communication styles, collaboration, conflict resolution, motivation and delegation, interviewing, understanding power, networking, and working on a team with various stakeholders.  Students will learn about professionalism and office communication, effectively using LinkedIn, marketing your skills, dining etiquette, transitioning from college to the workforce, negotiating salaries, understanding benefits, realistic expectations of an entry-level position, and building a career.  The purpose of this course is to increase students’ understanding of how to interact and work with others as effective team members and engaged citizens.  Students have the opportunity to develop those skills listed and apply what they have learned in CLA and to reflect upon their experiences.  Students will accomplish this by conducting a class service project with a community partner in the Iowa City/Coralville area.  This project work is intended to connect what students learned about themselves in CLA Part 1, as well as community needs and the agencies that address those needs.  Students will examine and apply the Social Change Model of Leadership to their service project work in an effort to understand how individuals, groups, and communities interact, effect and change each other through their work together.  Additional information on the Career Leadership Academy may be found at http://www.careers.uiowa.edu/leadershipacademy/

 

Rhetoric

Rhetoric, RHET:1030

Breyan Neyland, Jason England, Perry Howell, Matthew Gilchrist

Analysis and critique to discover, question, explain, and justify positions and claims made in writing and speaking; reading and listening to comprehend and assess arguments; employment of rhetorical concepts (e.g., purpose, audience); understanding research as responsible inquiry for speaking and writing; special topics, activities.

Persuading Different Audiences, RHET:2065

Jason England

Examination of ways people sway one another in different contexts; best means to impel a specific audience in a particular moment, recognizing that audiences and contexts are multiplied by technology; students critique current presentational techniques with special attention to how each succeeds or fails in its approach to relevant audiences; creation of multimodal projects for real world purposes (e.g., personal web sites, persuasive video or audio essays, promotional project for local advocacy group, public performance); formal presentations on results of inquiry-guided research.

 

Spanish

Spanish Sound Structure, SPAN:3110

Christine Shea

This course is an introduction to the study of the sound system of Spanish focusing on articulatory phonetics. It has two main objectives: i) to teach you basic phonetic and phonological concepts that will enable you to pursue more advanced courses in Spanish phonology and ii) to help you improve your Spanish pronunciation through the description of the sound structure of the language and plenty of oral and transcription exercises. Additionally, you will become acquainted with the main Spanish dialects and their phonetic tendencies. At the beginning of the course, you will select a Spanish-speaking country whose pronunciation tendencies you would like to study in deeper detail. Based on the knowledge you gain in class and the information you gather through your own research, you will do an oral presentation at the end of the course on the pronunciation of that country. The classes include lectures, exercises, and plenty of pronunciation practices. Written and oral homework and quizzes are given regularly. There is a midterm exam, a final exam, and an oral presentation. Active class participation is mandatory.

This course counts toward the Latina/o Studies minor.

 

Intro to Spanish Language Acquisition, SPAN:3170

Christine Shea

In this course we will discuss the development of a first language and the acquisition of a second language. We will examine the way in which children and adults acquire the sounds, words and grammar of their target language and how it might be different for each group of learners. Over the course of the semester, students will complete four homework assignments, a mid-term and final exam, and in-class activities related to analyzing data from language learners.

This course counts toward the Latina/o Studies minor.

 

Readings in Spanish Literature, SPAN:2400

Ana Rodriguez Rodriguez

This course introduces undergraduate students to the analysis and interpretation of Spanish literature and culture. Emphasis is placed on acquiring a beginning understanding of literary trends and cultural periods in Spain. The course is especially designed for students who have no background in literary study and who are still developing their language skills in Spanish. Requirements include assigned readings in Spanish literature and culture, as well as assigned viewings of Spanish films, quizzes, three midterms, short essays, and attendance and participation at section meetings.

 

Translation Workshop: English to Spanish, SPAN:3030

Pilar Marce

This course will introduce to students to written and sight translation: translation theory, elements that comprise a good translation and an effective translation process, and cultural aspects involved in it. Through practice and graded exercises in written translation, students will learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages -English and Spanish -to identify, analyze, and resolve potential translation problems, and become familiar with the necessary resources for terminology and information. This class is highly participatory in nature, and it is conducted as a workshop. The class starts with work on isolated sentences devised to practice specific areas in English > Spanish translation and then moves on to the translation covering different topics and problem areas.  NOTE: Students who took SPAN:3030 in Fall of 2011, Spring of 2012, or Fall of 2012 (focus: translation from Spanish to English) may take SPAN:3030 this semester without incurring duplication. If you are one of these students, you should simply register for SPAN:3030 as you normally would, but you must also send an e-mail to Prof. Denise Filios (denise-filios@uiowa.edu ) so that Graduation Analysis can be informed.

 

Business Spanish, SPAN:3040

Pilar Marce

This course helps to prepare students for careers in business, international relations, and other professions involving business activities in international or U.S. Hispanic working environments. The course goals are: (1) to develop the ability to communicate in Spanish using specialized commercial language; (2) to become familiar with documents and proceedings in the world of business conducted in Spanish; (3) to augment knowledge of Spanish culture, especially in relation to the business world; and (4) to reinforce the four basic linguistic skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading in Spanish as applied to the commercial context.

 

Spanish in the US, SPAN:2050

Julia Oliver Rajan

Did you know that Spanish predates English in what is now the United States? Have you ever heard the term Spanglish? Do you know that it has rules just like any other language system? A course covering historical and sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in the U.S. where students will learn through readings and discussions about the demographic and linguistic varieties of Spanish spoken in this country. Students will study the foundations on the following topics: language choice, language policies, bilingualism and bilingual education, the myths about Spanglish and the sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in the United States. Taught in English. The required textbook is available at the University Book Store: Varieties of Spanish in the United States (1st Edition) Author:  Lipski, John M. ISBN-13: 9781589012134Pub Date:  2008. Publisher:  Georgetown University Press.

This course counts toward the Latino/a Studies minor.

 

Madrid, SPAN:3620

Thomas Lewis

The general goals of this course are (a) to explore key moments in the rich cultural history of Madrid, the capital of Spain and one of the premier cities of the European Union; (b) to understand the development of modernity in Spain as experienced and interpreted by madrileños and madrileñas; and (c) to expand reading, listening, writing, and speaking abilities in Spanish. Specifically, I hope that by the end of the course you will: (1) Acquire a mental map of Madrid and be able to identify a number of districts, key sites, and historic landmarks; (2) Understand changes in Madrid’s physical and human geographies from the Middle Ages to the present; (3) Imagine and make decisions about a visit to Madrid; (4) Critique both typical and unusual images (or self-images) of Madrid and madrileños/madrileñas; (5) Analyze aspects of the cultural style of different periods in Madrid’s history, especially as reflected in architecture, public spaces, fashion, literature, painting, and film; (6) Connect issues and themes encountered in the course readings to your personal life; (7) Compare the challenges of modernization in Madrid to what you know of modernization in the U.S. or elsewhere; (8) Learn how to find information—from tourist advice to contemporary urban planning—concerning Madrid; (9) Advance in your reading, writing, listening and speaking proficiencies in Spanish; (10) Want to continue learning more about Madrid as well as other cities and areas of the Spanish state through reading, TV, the Internet, and travel. Your final grade will be determined according to the following weighted values: (1) 20 short in-class quizzes (20%); (2) 20 open-book pre-reading activities (20%); a team Wiki project (30%); a team Powerpoint presentation (15%); and one 10-page final project (15%).

 

Teaching and Learning

Methods: Secondary Reading, EDTL:4394

Carolyn Colvin

Methods and materials used in teaching developmental reading in all junior and senior high school content areas.

 

Orientation To Secondary Education, EDTL:3090

Nancy Langguth

Overview, including options for student teaching, classroom observation, lesson planning, classroom management, performance indicators, INTASC standards, blood borne pathogens, professional ethics.

 

Education Policy Leadership Studies

Assessment Higher Ed & Student Affairs, EPLS:5253

Wayne Jacobson

Theories, practices, and issues relevant to assessment of student outcomes and institutional effectiveness in higher education; basic overview of research, assessment, and evaluation; elements of assessment design, including methods for data collection and analysis; relevant ethical and political dilemmas; practical assessment activities.

 

Management Sciences

Optimization and Simulation Modeling, MSCI:3800

Jeffrey Ohlmann

How to leverage data and apply spreadsheet optimization software and Monte Carlo simulation to form optimal decision policies.

 

Decision Support Systems, MSCI:3025

Michael Colbert

Introduction to programming Visual Basic for Applications in Excel to develop spreadsheet-based decision-support systems.

 

Museum Studies

Collection Care and Management, MUSM:3200

Tiffany Adrain

How a museum's management policy relates to its administrative, legal, and ethical obligations to its collections; acquisitions, deaccessions, collection use, data standards, storage environment, health, safety, documentation. As an introduction to the principles of collection management, the course relates management policies to the administrative, legal, and ethical obligations a museum has to its collections. Topics for discussion include acquisitions, deaccessions, collection use, data standards, documentation, preventive conservation, risk assessment and disaster planning. The course is designed for students planning museum careers or upper-level students who may care for collections as part of their professional responsibilities. Class meets once weekly for lectures and group discussions. Grading is based on two written assignments, and a final exam. Readings are selected from books and current museum journals.

Political Science

Introduction to Political Communication, POLI:1600

Bob Boynton

Institutions, dynamics, issues of political communities considered as networks of communication; representative topics include political actors, ads, films, media, myths, news, publics, regulations, rhetorics, symbols. Political communication from conversation to Twitter. Politics is persuasion, and how we engage in that persuasion is the focus of the course. Political communication is both personal and global, and new technologies are emerging that dramatically extend our reach. One of my granddaughters is in Lynchburg, Virginia the other is in Phnom Penh Cambodia. They see each other and talk every day. That reach creates very new opportunities in political communication. 

 

Understanding Political Research, POLI:3000

Caroline Tolbert

Creating knowledgeable evaluators of current research in political science; interpretation of different quantitative techniques with examples from current political science research. This course will introduce students to the basics of political science data analysis and research, including an introduction to statistics. It will help students understand how social scientists study political phenomena as well as learning statistical applications for applied research. We will learn about how to develop causal explanations about politics and society, develop testable research hypotheses, design statistical tests for evaluating these hypothesis, run statistical models and learn how to interpret the results. Emphasis will be on doing statistics in a hands-on learning environment (TILE classroom) rather than on memorizing statistical formulas- though some formulas will be introduced, memorization will not be required. We will learn practical skills about using software, such as Stata, for analyzing and graphing and visualizing data. We will also engage in a hands-on research project of our own: students in this course will help design and participate in participate in a study of the 2016 presidential candidates in Iowa. Part of the class will thus focus data collection regarding the 2016 presidential candidates, analyzing the data and more.

 

Global Communication and Politics, POLI:3515

Bob Boynton

How distance and language barriers in communication have fallen since 2000; how politics and the world are affected when such barriers to communication disappear. Technological changes in communication have dramatically altered the ability to communicate globally. Communication and culture are interlinked; as the communication possibilities increase, the shared culture becomes richer. The primary focus of this course is on the new global culture that is emerging. What is it becoming? A second focus is developing skills to engage in multimedia communication.

 

Problems in Methods: Visualizing Social Science Data, POLI:3050

Frederick Boehmke

Problems in political science research methods; data collection, interpretation, analysis. Visualization is often the easiest and most effective way to present data. Social science data are becoming ever more prevalent and complex, requiring a variety of techniques for collecting and displaying them. Students in this course will learn tools and guidelines for effective visual presentation of social science data. We will cover basic scatter plots and bar charts as well as approaches for visualizing the results with more complex analyses "under the hood". We will explore techniques for displaying geographic data, visualizing network data, showing patterns in text and social media data, and making infographics. We also discuss techniques for effective presentations that incorporate both text and data visualizations. No background in data analysis or statistical software is required. We will learn the appropriate techniques for data collection and processing needed to get them in the proper structure for the various types of visualizations.

 

Hawkeye Poll, POLI:3001

Abigail Rury

Basics of survey design, sampling, question wording, interpreting responses, and writing press releases; students work together to help design questions as part of the Hawkeye Poll, a collaborative teaching and research enterprise in the Department of Political Science. Public opinion polls are a vital component of contemporary politics. The goal of this course is to help students interested in polls learn the skills required to design, conduct, and interpret surveys. We will explore the fundamental elements of survey research: selecting a sample, survey design, question wording, implementing the poll in a call center environment, interpreting the responses, and writing press releases. The course emphasizes hands-on training that will provide useful skills for academic and professional settings.

 

Introduction to American Foreign Policy, POLI:1501:0A04/5

N/A

Foreign policies: goals, basic themes and general patterns, problems encountered by policy makers, means employed in dealing with other nations and international organizations, processes by which policies are formulated, factors that influence structure of policies. Since its founding, the US has grown from a relatively small power to the most powerful nation in the world. How did the US go from a small power to the world’s leader? How are American foreign policy decisions made? What are current foreign policy issues facing the United States? This course examines all of these questions by looking at the history of American foreign policy, examining how different branches of government attempt to influence foreign policy, and discussing current foreign policy debates facing policy-makers. Topics covered include the causes and consequences of major wars like World War 2 and Vietnam, American Exceptionalism, and US policy towards terrorism and the Middle East.  Students are evaluated based on two non-cumulative exams, quizzes, a short paper, a presentation, and participation in section. This course is appropriate for any student. No prior knowledge or skills are required. This class fulfills requirements for the Political Science, International Relations, and the Ethics and Public Policy major.

 

Religious Studies

Harry Potter: Mystery and Magic of Life, RELS:1997

Robert Gerstmyer

Exploration of Harry Potter novels and films that offer millions of people an entrée into a world of wizards, witches, and muggles; this engrossing world created by J.K. Rowling invites readers and viewers to explore the power of human imagination, creates a space for asking questions of personal significance (What defines me as a person? What sort of person am I in the process of becoming? What are the most significant factors that are shaping my identity and destiny?); students read selections and view film segments while exploring these essential questions.

 

Journalism and Mass Communication

The Business of Sports Communication, JMC:3181

Charles Munro

Critical and practical approach to understanding contemporary sports media and business practices that mark it; focus on sports media industries and institutions; branding, marketing, demographic, public relations, and promotional factors that shape content. This course is about the business practices of contemporary sports media in a time of intense but changing audience demand. It will focus on sports industries and institutions, specifically amateur and professional organizations and the branding, marketing, demographic, public relations and promotional factors that shape content. The course meets in a specially equipped, high-tech space (TILE classroom) that encourages group learning. That means the emphasis is on working in teams on case studies covering a broad range of hot topics in sports media. Students will be challenged to analyze current, often high-profile, sports business situations and find solutions to dilemmas faced by popular organizations and demanding audiences. This course is practically oriented and intended to acquaint students with business practices of profit-seeking organizations. Participation in group discussions – many of which will spark debates - is a must!

 

Sociology

Research Methods, SOC:1010

Jennifer Glanville

Basic scientific concepts; emphasis on theoretical thinking, statement of researchable propositions, logic and meaning of proof operant in the research process; general issues in designing social research, including problems of sampling and measurement, analysis, presenting research data, interpreting research findings. This class is required for the major in Sociology and provides an overview of the methods used by sociologists to develop, test, and refine theories to explain social phenomena. The major topics covered in this course include: the relationship of theory to method, the development of testable hypotheses, issues of validity and reliability in measurement, survey design and sampling, experimental methods, and qualitative inquiry. Useful examples of research are provided, and students will develop their own research projects to show their understanding of the material. The grade will be based on class activities, quizzes, participation, tests, and the final research project.

 

Small Group Analysis, SOC:1020

Alison Bianchi

Internal processes governing small groups (e.g., friendship cliques, families, the president's cabinet, committees); how small groups relate to the larger social environment; groups' impact on their members. Because we are social creatures, we are highly interdependent with other persons. That is, our behavior, attitudes, cognition, emotions, and outcomes are influenced by the people with whom we interact. Small groups are an area in which interdependence with others is particularly important. Much of our interaction with others takes place in the context of small groups. In this course we will explore a range of issues related to behavior in groups, including why individuals join groups, how groups influence their members (and vice versa), group structure, leadership, etc. We will investigate theories, research, interventions, and applications concerning small groups. Traditional and contemporary topics related to groups will be covered; however, we will take a decidedly sociological social psychological approach to this field. At the end of this course, you should: • Know and understand the main theories, concepts, and research findings in the areas of group processes • Be able to apply your knowledge to “real life” groups • Know and understand the methods that social psychologists use to study small groups • Be able to think more critically about social psychology theory, research, and applications You will be required to take one midterm and a final. You will complete one, 15-paged paper. Other small assignments may be scheduled.

 

Theatre Arts

Arts Leadership Seminar, THTR:4510

David McGraw

Performing arts management and administrative principles, practical applications, trends in arts leadership and advocacy.

 

Urban and Regional Planning

Analytic Methods in Planning 1, URP:6200

Lucie Laurian

Methods used in planning and policy analysis; emphasis on application of statistical techniques and quantitative reasoning to planning problems; use of computers and data systems in planning analysis. This course covers methods used in planning and policy analysis. Emphasis is on application of statistical techniques and quantitative reasoning to planning problems. The use of computers and data systems in planning analysis also are covered.

 

History and Theories of Planning, URP:6203

Charles Connerly

History of urban planning in America as a reflection of social and economic forces; alternative planning philosophies, roles, and ethical choices open to planners. This course seeks to introduce graduate students to the key topics, trends, events, institutions, characters, and arguments of (or about) urban and regional planning in America. It does so first by constructing a 110-year history of planning in the U.S., and second by considering contestable interpretations of what planning is, what the object of planning is, who plans, and what constitutes a good city and good planning.

 

American Sign Language

Deafness in the Media, ASL:3500

Exploration of the construct of deafness through mainstream media (e.g., commercial television, movies, fictional and nonfictional literature in print and on the Internet); various ways deaf people are constructed and presented for hearing audiences from the past 20 years. Taught in American Sign Language. Exploration of the construct of deafness through mainstream media (e.g., commercial television, movies, fictional and nonfictional literature in print and on the Internet); various ways deaf people are constructed and presented for hearing audiences from the past 20 years, including deaf as long-suffering victims, deaf as heroes overcoming adversity, deaf as rebels against the mainstream, and deaf as lonely outcasts.  Taught in American Sign Language. This course will count towards the ASL Minor.

 

Business Administration

Business Communication and Protocol, BUS:3000

N/A

Foundation in business communication and protocol; composing business messages, organizing and reporting workplace data, developing business presentation and team-building skills, exploring issues pertaining to professional behavior.

 

Earth and Environmental Science

First Year Seminar: Rocks from the Sky: Impact Craters and Meteorites, EES:1000

David Peate

Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Rocks are continually ‘falling from the sky’: smaller ones are found as meteorites, larger ones can form craters such as Meteor Crater in Arizona. In this class, we will discuss: 1. how the study of meteorites helps scientists understand the origins of the Solar System and the formation of the planets, and 2. how major meteorite impacts on the Earth’s surface have had significant effects on the Earth’s environment through geologic time, including the extinction of the Dinosaurs. Students will learn about Iowa’s own Manson impact crater and how to recognize the different types of meteorites using a recently donated meteorite collection. They will do several computer-based activities: using Google Earth to investigate features of different impact craters around the world, and using a web-based computer program to model the effects of meteorite impacts under different conditions (size of meteorite, distance from impact). We will use the book “Meteorite” by Smith / Russell / Benedix, plus additional readings, as the basis for weekly discussions. A scientific background will not be necessary for this class, and the material will be accessible to entering college students. The course will be taught in a way to encourage active student engagement, interaction, and collaboration during class. Grades will be based on attendance and active participation in class activities and discussions (demonstrating completion of assigned readings and web research) and several short writing assignments.

 

Mineralogy, EES:2410:0AAA

Mark Reagan

Physical, chemical, and optical properties of minerals; phase relations; structures; associations; diagnostic features for identification. Offered fall semesters. The purpose of this course is to introduce geology and other science majors to minerals and the rocks that contain them. Topics include mineral identification, mineral structures, crystal chemistry and crystallography, optical methods, and phase equilibrium of mineral systems. These subjects are prerequisite to a complete understanding of rock-forming processes (petrology) required of the geology major. Course format consists of three one-hour lectures and a three-hour lab each week. A field trip may be taken. Grades are based on two lecture midterms, quizzes, a lecture final exam, lab problems, weekly lab mineral exams, and mineral formula quizzes. A professor presents the class lectures and grades the lecture exams; a TA instructs the lab section and grades all lab materials.

 

Introduction to Geology, EES:1050:0A01/2/3/4

Charles Foster

Minerals, rocks, and rock-forming processes (including volcanoes and sedimentary environments); surface processes (rivers, groundwater, glaciers, deserts, ocean shorelines), major earth processes (continental drift, plate tectonics, earthquakes, mountain building); impact on civilization. Offered fall semesters. This course is intended for science majors, honor students, and others with a strong interest in geology. It presents the fundamental principles of geology. The course includes five major topic areas: (1) earth materials including minerals and rocks; (2) earth-surface processes involving running water, groundwater, ice, wind, waves, and their resulting land forms; (3) the physical and chemical systems of the planet including earthquakes, volcanism, plate tectonics, and mountain building; (4) energy and mineral resources; and (5) geological time as deduced from the rock record. Course format consists of three lectures and one lab period per week. Labs involve hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, topographic and geologic maps, and geologic cross-sections. Grades are based on several class quizzes, a midterm, and a comprehensive final exam (60% of the grade); and the lab (40%). Quizzes and exams may include essay questions. A text and lab manual are required. The lectures are taught by a professor and labs are taught by select TAs.

 

Age of Dinosaurs, EES:1070:0A01/2/3/4/5/6/7/8

N/A

Origin and evolutionary history of dinosaurs; diversity of dinosaurian groups, their geographic distributions and paleoecology; origins of flight among dinosaurs; environmental context, including other animals and plants that lived alongside dinosaurs; the so-called extinction of dinosaurs and radiation of modern forms; the role dinosaurs play in the interaction between science and the popular media. Offered fall semesters. This course treats the origin and evolutionary history of dinosaurs. Topics include the diversity of dinosaurian groups, with discussion of their geographic distributions and paleoecology; the origins of flight among dinosaurs; environmental context, including other animals and plants that lived alongside dinosaurs; the so-called extinction of dinosaurs and radiation of modern forms; and the role dinosaurs play in the interaction between science and the popular media. Readings are drawn from recent publications. Grades are based on lab assignments, lecture quizzes, midterms, and a final exam. Students are expected to attend three lectures and one lab session per week. The lectures are taught by a professor and labs are taught by TAs.

 

Energy and Society: History and Science of Oil, EES:1115:0A01/2

Bradley Cramer

History, politics, and science of oil and oil industry. The modern world has been shaped by and founded on the exploration for and utilization of petroleum. The ‘Oil Age’ in which we live has been dominated by the political, historical, and scientific realities of oil, and any attempts to understand global political history or the modern global climate science debate require an understanding of this critical industry and its history. Here, we will investigate the oil industry through its role in and feedbacks with history, politics, and science.

 

Natural Disasters, EES:1400:0A01/2/3/5/6/7/8

N/A

How earth-atmosphere-hydrosphere-space systems produce events catastrophic to humans on the scale of individual lives to civilizations; root causes of earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, floods, hurricanes, tsunami, tornadoes, and asteroid impact, and their local, national, and global impact; spatial and temporal occurrences of these hazards; methods and processes for hazard preparedness, response, and recovery; social, economic, and policy aspects that affect and compound the magnitude of disasters associated with natural phenomena; case studies drawn from contemporary and ancient societies.

 

Psychology and Quantitative Foundations

Program Evaluation, PSQF:6265

Liz Hollingworth

Theoretical issues and considerations in evaluation of educational and social programs; evaluation design, methodology; metaevaluation; evaluation utilization.

 

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Process Calculations, CBE:2105

Julie Jessop

Fundamental principles of chemical process analysis, including material and energy balances for single-unit and multiple-unit processes, analysis of reactive and nonreactive systems, introduction to equations of state, thermodynamics of multiphase systems. Fundamental principles of chemical process analysis, including material and energy balances for single-unit and multiple-unit processes, analysis of reactive and nonreactive systems, introduction to equations of state, thermodynamics of multiphase systems. Course Website: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~webmeb/web_course/ Contact the Associate Dean to override restriction for students who are non-engineering majors.

 

Geographical and Sustainability Sciences

The Global Economy, GEOG:2910

Claire Pavlik

Examination of contemporary economic geography; types of national economies, uneven development, role of government in shaping economy, multinational corporations; foundation for understanding national economies and economic statistics; contemporary issues including economic globalization, commodification of nature, de-industrialization. Why are various economic activities located in different places? How are these locations changing? What is globalization and how does it affect local economies? This course, designed for students in all majors, examines the economic geography of the world. During the first 12 weeks, we focus on important factors that affect the location and distribution of economic activities across the globe. Major topics include population distributions, variation in regional economies, natural resource distribution, industrial location, foreign investment, and international trade. The remaining weeks are devoted to examining the position of selected nations and groups of nations in the international economy. Here, the key topics are world economic development, regional economic structures, and regional growth and decline. Class meetings include lectures and discussions. Final grades are based on four assignments, two midterms, the final exam, and participation.

 

College of Nursing

PRlll: Improving Health Systems, NURS:3660

Jacinda Bunch

Legal and regulatory processes that impact health care, how disparities influence health care, and evidence-based approaches for improving quality of care; strategies for working effectively in intra and interdisciplinary teams; integration of a culture of safety.

 

Gerontological Nursing, NURS:3620

Nicole Peterson

Nurse's role in promoting, maintaining, and restoring the health of aging adults; internal and external influences on older adults, application of nursing science to the care of older adults in diverse settings.

 

Anthropology

People and the Environment: Technology, Culture, & Social Justice, ANTH:1046:0001/2

Meena Khandelwal

How resources, commodities, people, and ideas cross borders; examination of globalization through issues of technology, social justice, environment; perspectives from anthropology, gender studies, geography, energy science, and development. Technology, Culture, and Social Justice: This is a course about ‘big questions’ related to environment and culture: How is my life connected to that of a village woman in India who spends hours cutting fuel wood to cook the family dinner? How is my life linked to global environmental change?  How should we live with the earth?  A team of five faculty will guide you through the process of addressing urgent, real world problems by focusing on the causes of environmental degradation in Rajasthan, India, in comparison with Iowa, in order to find possible solutions. We will explore how people, ideas and things cross borders - ‘globalization’- through issues of technology, social justice and environment by bringing together anthropology, gender studies, geography, energy science and development.  This course will promote critical thinking by prioritizing active learning via classroom activities, discussion and team work (facilitated by round tables in a TILE classroom), supplemented with short lectures.  Our emphasis will be on applying key concepts and models from both natural and social science to our case studies of India and the United States, a task that is both challenging and exciting.  Assignments will include weekly quizzes, exams, short essays, and a final research project. 

 

School of Art and Art History

Creativity for a Lifetime, ARTS:2000:0001/2

Anita Jung

Exploration of what senior artists can teach about creativity and aging; interdisciplinary project-based collaborative learning opportunities that consider role of arts and creativity across a lifespan; essential skills necessary to be professionals in numerous careers including health, social work, education, humanities, and the arts; integration of teamwork and opportunities for individual growth that allow for personal development; identification of ways for students to be more creative in their own lives and work. In Creativity for a Lifetime, students will learn the significance of creativity in human happiness and success. Creativity is part of what makes us human, and understanding the creative process is relevant to all of us. In this course, we will examine questions about big ideas, such as: What is creativity and how can we be more creative? What can we learn from closely examining our own and others’ creative work? What is the role of creativity across the human lifespan? How can creative work be a part of healthy adult life and healthy aging? We will especially consider the lives and work of artists. Because artists intensively imagine things that don’t yet exist, understanding artist’s experiences will enhance innovation and imagination. Students in the arts, liberal arts, sciences, and social sciences can apply the experience gained from studying the outcomes of creativity and working with established artists to other academic disciplines. Students will engage in activities and projects as opposed to lectures and exams. Taught in an active-learning TILE classroom, Creativity for a Lifetime brings together the knowledge, skills, and life experiences of students and faculty members interested in an array of disciplines, including art and art history, anthropology, education, rhetoric, social work, aging studies, and the health sciences. To better appreciate the elements of successful aging, the richness of life-long learning, and an appreciation of the role of creative endeavor throughout a lifespan, students will meet Iowa artists and collect their oral histories. This course will be offered in a blended learning format. Blended learning refers to a course format that combines face-to-face classroom teaching and online components. Online learning components cover the course materials in the same depth as a face-to-face course meetings. Friday ARR session is replaced with specific online learning components that students are required to complete.

 

Physics and Astronomy

Origins of Life in the Universe (Part 1), ASTR:1060:0001/2

Cornelia Lang

Fundamental questions (How old is the universe? What is the nature of life? How has life evolved on Earth? What are our human origins? Are there other habitable planets in the universe?) that revolve around understanding origins from different perspectives (i.e., astronomy, physics, geoscience, biology, chemistry, anthropology); work with faculty from several departments to investigate these questions; inquiry-based activities to build success in critical thinking, teamwork, effective written and oral communication; origin of the universe, biochemistry of life, and origin of life on Earth; first of a two-part sequence. How old is the universe? What is the nature of life? How has life evolved on Earth? What are our human origins? Are there other habitable planets in the universe? These fundamental questions revolve around understanding origins from different perspectives: astronomy & physics, geoscience, biology, chemistry, and anthropology. In this course, students will work together with faculty from across several different departments to investigate these questions. We will use inquiry-based activities to build success in critical thinking, teamwork, and effective written and oral communication. Topics include the origin of the universe, the biochemistry of life and the origin of life on Earth. Designed for first and second year students, this course is intended to be taken over two semesters. Students should plan on taking the spring semester course (ASTR:1061). The spring semester course includes a 1 s.h. lab. If taken in its entirety (recommended), this course fulfills the 7 s.h. natural sciences GE requirement. The instructors are Cornelia Lang (Physics & Astronomy), Andrew Forbes (Biology), John Logsdon (Biology), and David Peate (Geoscience). More information is available at http://astro.physics.uiowa.edu/origins/ 

 

Engineering

Introduction to Sustainability, ENGR:2013:0001/2

Craig Just

Introduction to sustainability knowledge, skills, and habits as a means to shape one vision of a sustainable citizen; emphasis on basic skills of literacy, applied math, and finding information; exploration of sustainability knowledge areas via increasing levels of democratic dialoguing and attention to increasing larger system sizes; traditional sustainability knowledge areas related to society, economy, and environment; intersecting themes (e.g., informed consumerism, eco-economics, livable environments). This course is required for the UI Certificate in Sustainability which seeks to place students on a path toward becoming effective leaders and agents of change for sustainability in whatever professional setting they choose, whether it is as an academic researcher and teacher, a corporate officer, a technology specialist, a farmer, a grassroots advocate, or a government official. Please view the course introduction, located at http://online.continuetolearn.uiowa.edu/intro057013/.

 

Engineering Fundamentals 1: Statics, ENGR:2100:0AAA

Madhavan Raghavan

Vector algebra, forces, couples, moments, resultants of force couple systems; friction, equilibrium analysis of particles and finite bodies, centroids; applications. Vector algebra, forces, couples, moments, resultants of force couple systems; friction, equilibrium analysis of particles and finite bodies, centroids; applications. Contact the Associate Dean to override restriction for students who are non-engineering majors. If you are not a member of the University of Iowa Honors Program, you may contact the course instructor in order to request permission to enroll.

 

Engineering Fund 2: Electrical Circuits, ENGR:2120:0CCC

Mark Andersland

Kirchhoff's laws and network theorems; analysis of DC circuits; first order transient response; sinusoidal steady-state analysis; elementary principles of circuit design; SPICE analysis of DC, AC, and transient circuits. Kirchhoff's laws and network theorems; analysis of DC circuits; first order transient response; sinusoidal steady-state analysis; elementary principles of circuit design. Midterm exams for lecture 0CCC will be held from 6:30-8:30pm in 101 BBE on:
Friday, October 2, 2015
Friday, November 13, 2015

If you are not a member of the University of Iowa Honors Program, you may contact the course instructor in order to request permission to enroll. Contact the Associate Dean to override restriction for students who are non-engineering majors.

 

History

Policy Matters: Perspective Contemporary Problems, HIST:1119:0001/2

Examination of major social issues and challenges faced by nation, state, and communities; what government's role is in a democratic society; how we decide when, where, and how government acts in ways consistent with social goals and values; focus on pressing social issues (i.e., education, inequality, labor standards, health care); historical development of the problem or policy; ways we address social issues; effectiveness of current policies and alternative policies; ways in which social science contributes to policy design and assessment. "Policy Matters" examines the ways in which we address the major social issues and challenges that we face in the nation, in the state, and in our communities.  We begin with the fundamental and elemental questions: What it is the role of government in a democratic society? How do we decide when, where, and how government acts—in ways that are consistent with our social goals and values? Policy Matters will focus on a selection of our most pressing social issues such as education, inequality, labor standards, and health care.  On each of these topics, we will devote attention to the historical development of the problem or policy in question (both to provide background, and to help students imagine historical alternatives).  We will trace the ways in which we address these social issues and engage students in critically analysis (through evaluation and comparison) of both the effectiveness of current policies and the universe of policy alternatives. And we will examine the ways in which social science contributes to both policy design and policy assessment (How do we know what works?).   The course will be co-taught by Sarah Bruch (Sociology) and Colin Gordon (History), with the participation of other UI faculty (and members of the community) on given topics.

 

Mechanical Engineering

Energy Systems Design, ME:4048:0001/2

N/A

Principles and design of energy conversion systems, including solar, wind, and geothermal power systems; design of thermal-fluid system components, modeling and simulation of systems, optimization techniques; design projects. Principles and design of energy conversion systems, including solar, wind, and geothermal power systems; design of thermal‑fluid system components, modeling and simulation of systems, optimization techniques; design projects. Contact the Associate Dean to override restriction for students who are non-engineering majors.